Description

Werner Molders Messerschmitt Bf-109
By Artist, Craig Tinder

Printed on a heavy, matte substrate, this archival art print is fade-resistant with an astonishingly high resolution to bring out rivet-level details.

Considered by many to be one of the most highly influential fighter aces of WW2, Werner Molders (nicknamed 'Vati' translated: "Daddy") quickly amassed a victory count far outpacing his peers until his death in 1941. Werner Molders would lead the Condor Legion in enemy victories during the Spanish Civil War and authored many of the Luftwaffe tactical doctrines and dog fighting techniques still used to this day. In 1941 he was promoted to Inspector of General Fighters by Luftwaffe High Command and would not be allowed to fly additional combat missions. Unfortunately, he was killed in a flying accident en route to the World War I Flying Ace, Ernst Udet's funeral. Werner Molders became the first combat pilot ever to amass 100 aerial victories.

This item is printed on demand and typically requires 2-3 day for printing prior to shipment.

About the Artist:

Craig Tinder is an artist/historian specializing in the creation of digital aviation art work and has held a lifelong passion and interest toward history and painting. Craig grew up hanging on the fences at the Reno Air Races which fueled his passion for illustrating his favorite subject matter: WW2 aircraft. As a Loadmaster and restorer on a B-17 Flying Fortress, he understands the intricate details of his pursuits and re-creates one-of-a-kind warbird illustrations for the families of veterans. He has won numerous art shows and has contributed illustrations to a variety of publications and public education displays. Over the years, Craig has amassed a large collection of artifacts, period photos, clothing, weapons, and more, all of which are used as research materials in his paintings. He is an avid collector and serious historian - combined with his artistic talents, he produces exciting and accurate renditions of history. His original and limited-edition print work can be seen in many private collections around the world.

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